Were Remakes Always a Bad Idea? Sequel Speculation – LightTrain

Ahoy, I’m your conductor Gavin Nowak here again today with a topic that is circling many people’s heads – What’s with all these reboots? I want to delve deeper into the subject, specifying how these kinds of movies can be done well and why they’re being pumped out at remarkable rates. Let’s get this show on the road!

Now, what is a remake? Well, to put it simply, it’s a series or theatrical production that is based off a past property which is commonly done to update the original for a modern audience. While this isn’t an issue in the least, like many things, it has been twisted and exploited by the Hollywood business in order to cash in. Yes, I understand that these executives and the production team most likely have families to provide for, but instead of taking the easy route why not make a film that’s actually good. This way, positive buzz, awards shows and cult followings will possibly earn you more in the long term, plus you’ll be proud that you created something which is looked fondly upon decades later. Yeah, those Disney live-action adaptations may have scored big but everyone will undoubtedly return to the classics, leaving them, to quote Roy Batty from Blade Runner , ” … lost in time, like tears in rain .” Sorry, I couldn’t help it!

Am I saying all sequels and reboots are trash? Not necessarily. These flicks can be done well, although it is a very elegant procedure. In the first, establish the setting, our characters, and of course have them overcome whatever obstacles may be in their path. With a sequel, reveal a fact unbeknownst to our protagonists before, as to expand the world, mythos or offer some backstory. In Aliens, Lt. Ripley encounters the Weyland -Yutani marines and the alien queen, in Toy Story 2, Woody discovers he was the star of a television program titled “Woody’s Roundup”. The list includes many others, but these were just a few worthy examples.

To successfully cook up a solid revival you must swap out the original’s minor story beats and characters to refresh it. Plain and simple, but one element that should never be affiliated with the concept is remaking a acclaimed flick. It there is nothing relatively weighing the movie down then there is no real reason to attempt to “update” it since it’s not necessary. It’s like, per say, washing your clothes and throwing in a clean t shirt you found on the floor. Rather, why not use this process on low budget or trashy films? I mean, this is to improve upon the original work, is it not?

In the end though, I just want studios with more authentic features which is crafted by a crew whom are passionate about the project. After all, many of those cult classics and most beloved movies ever released experimented with a unique concept that payed off. Dr. Strangelove, Forrest Gump, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Pulp Fiction, The Matrix. Even Star Wars started out as an independent feature with a maverick director and an unknown cast destined to flop: look where it is now. So in conclusion, remakes aren’t leaving any time soon, but those creative pieces of cinema that explore different outlooks on culture or just keep you laughing the whole way will become those genuine gems we continue to watch for years to come.

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